Top Solutions for Neuropathy Pain You Need to Explore With Your Doctor

One Oak Medical, Dr. Ibrahim  National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

About 20 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with neuropathy, but that number actually might be a lot higher, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. That’s because there’s no single test for neuropathy and there are no standard guidelines regarding when or whom to test for the condition. Plus, neuropathy can cause an array of symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose in many cases.

At One Oak Medical, we use state-of-the-art techniques to diagnose neuropathy and the underlying issues that can cause it. Plus, we help patients understand all their treatment options so they can find the option that’s best for their needs and their long-term health and wellness.

What causes neuropathy?

Sometimes, the cause of a neuropathy can’t be determined. In that case, it’s called “idiopathic,” which means the cause is unknown. But most times, neuropathy is caused by one of these underlying issues:

Regardless of the cause of a neuropathy, the symptoms tend to be similar: numbness, local and radiating (“shooting”) pain, loss of sensation, tingling or pins-and-needles sensations, and loss of muscle strength.

Depending on which nerves are affected, you might have other symptoms, like:

You may also have heightened sensitivity or tenderness when your skin is touched near the damaged nerves.

Treatments for neuropathy

Your treatment will depend on what’s causing your neuropathy in the first place. Depending on the underlying issues, Dr. Ibrahim may recommend:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs)

NSAIDs can relieve both pain and inflammation, which can contribute to nerve compression and irritation.

Topical medicines

Gels, ointments, and patches that deliver local anesthetics and other medicines can help relieve more superficial types of nerve pain.

Anti-seizure medications or antidepressants

Both anti-seizure meds and some types of antidepressants can be very effective in “short-circuiting” the way the brain interprets pain signals, and other drugs can prevent pain signals from entering the brain in the first place.

Corticosteroid injections

Corticosteroids can help with inflammation, and because they’re administered with a needle, they’re also effective in targeting smaller areas. Often, they’re combined with anesthetics to reduce pain. Some injections use ultrasound to guide placement of the needle.

Physical therapy

Physical therapy helps relieve inflammation and pain while also helping to restore circulation in an area of damage. Circulation is important for healing, and it also helps carry away toxins that can make painful symptoms worse. Another benefit: Physical therapy is highly customizable, allowing your therapy to focus squarely on your symptoms.

Regenerative therapy

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and prolotherapy can both be used to stimulate the body’s natural healing processes, replacing damaged tissue with healthy tissue.

Surgery

In a very few instances, surgery may be recommended to relieve impingement on a nerve, like when a herniated disc is pressing on major nerves and causing problems with walking or bowel or bladder function.

Since so many factors can cause or contribute to neuropathy and its symptoms, your treatment will be entirely customized for your needs so you can enjoy optimal relief.

Put an end to neuropathy pain

At One Oak Medical, Dr. Ibrahim offers the most advanced pain treatments to both relieve symptoms and treat the underlying cause of neuropathy. To learn more about the options we offer at One Oak Medical or to find out what’s causing your nerve-related symptoms, book an appointment online today.

About 20 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with neuropathy, but that number actually might be a lot higher, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. That’s because there’s no single test for neuropathy and there are no standard guidelines regarding when or whom to test for the condition. Plus, neuropathy can cause an array of symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose in many cases.

At One Oak Medical, we use state-of-the-art techniques to diagnose neuropathy and the underlying issues that can cause it. Plus, we help patients understand all their treatment options so they can find the option that’s best for their needs and their long-term health and wellness.

What causes neuropathy?

Sometimes, the cause of a neuropathy can’t be determined. In that case, it’s called “idiopathic,” which means the cause is unknown. But most times, neuropathy is caused by one of these underlying issues:

Regardless of the cause of a neuropathy, the symptoms tend to be similar: numbness, local and radiating (“shooting”) pain, loss of sensation, tingling or pins-and-needles sensations, and loss of muscle strength.

Depending on which nerves are affected, you might have other symptoms, like:

You may also have heightened sensitivity or tenderness when your skin is touched near the damaged nerves.

Treatments for neuropathy

Your treatment will depend on what’s causing your neuropathy in the first place. Depending on the underlying issues, Dr. Ibrahim may recommend:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs)

NSAIDs can relieve both pain and inflammation, which can contribute to nerve compression and irritation.

Topical medicines

Gels, ointments, and patches that deliver local anesthetics and other medicines can help relieve more superficial types of nerve pain.

Anti-seizure medications or antidepressants

Both anti-seizure meds and some types of antidepressants can be very effective in “short-circuiting” the way the brain interprets pain signals, and other drugs can prevent pain signals from entering the brain in the first place.

Corticosteroid injections

Corticosteroids can help with inflammation, and because they’re administered with a needle, they’re also effective in targeting smaller areas. Often, they’re combined with anesthetics to reduce pain. Some injections use ultrasound to guide placement of the needle.

Physical therapy

Physical therapy helps relieve inflammation and pain while also helping to restore circulation in an area of damage. Circulation is important for healing, and it also helps carry away toxins that can make painful symptoms worse. Another benefit: Physical therapy is highly customizable, allowing your therapy to focus squarely on your symptoms.

Regenerative therapy

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and prolotherapy can both be used to stimulate the body’s natural healing processes, replacing damaged tissue with healthy tissue.

Surgery

In a very few instances, surgery may be recommended to relieve impingement on a nerve, like when a herniated disc is pressing on major nerves and causing problems with walking or bowel or bladder function.

Since so many factors can cause or contribute to neuropathy and its symptoms, your treatment will be entirely customized for your needs so you can enjoy optimal relief.

Put an end to neuropathy pain

At One Oak Medical, Dr. Ibrahim offers the most advanced pain treatments to both relieve symptoms and treat the underlying cause of neuropathy. To learn more about the options we offer at One Oak Medical or to find out what’s causing your nerve-related symptoms, book an appointment online today.

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